DRILL Blog and News

DRILL Launch Wales: Disabled people to lead on £5 million research programme

Disabled people will be at the forefront of designing an innovative new £5 million UK-wide programme on Disability Research on Independent Living and Learning (DRILL).

DRILL is fully funded by the Big Lottery Fund and will be delivered across the UK by a consortium of national disabled people’s organisations, including Disability Wales.

The DRILL programme, which is launched in Wales on 22 September, will see disabled people working alongside academics and policy makers to develop the programme. The programme will gather evidence on the social barriers to independent living and learning which disabled people face. Research findings will be used to develop pilot projects and inform policy development and practice to bring about real improvements to the lives of disabled people.

Rhian Davies, Chief Executive of Disability Wales, said:

“This is the first research programme which ensures disabled people, and the issues that matter to us, are central to research funding decisions. The aim is to build a solid evidence base on the initiatives and support which enable disabled people to fully participate in society. When everyone can participate in the world we live in, it makes sense for us all. Given the emphasis in Wales on ‘voice and control’, the DRILL programme is very timely and will provide a golden opportunity to provide the evidence that will shape future policy and legislation from the citizen’s perspective”.

DRILL is expected to fund a total of 40 research proposals and pilot projects across the UK. It will investigate how public money can be best used to support disabled people’s social, economic and political inclusion. The research programme will aim to identify the solutions that work best for people living with a range of impairments, chronic health conditions and circumstances.

The funding criteria will be decided after a series of engagement events with disabled people, under the research themes of peer support, autonomy, resilience and social, economic and civic participation. Disabled people and their organisations will be supported to work on their research bids in partnership with academics and policy makers.

A Central Research Committee (CRC) will decide which research proposals are taken forward. Disabled academic Dr Tom Shakespeare, chair of the CRC, said:

“Research can make a real difference to disabled people’s lives. It documents our experiences, and the barriers we face. But the best research is done in partnership with disabled people themselves. I am looking forward to the new research findings with real excitement.”

A call for research proposals will be issued early next year and the first round of funding is expected to be announced in April 2016.

For further information please go to www.drilluk.org.uk



Pobl anabl i arwain rhaglen ymchwil £5 miliwn

Bydd pobl anabl yn chwarae rhan flaenllaw wrth gynllunio rhaglen arloesol gwerth £5 miliwn ar draws y Deyrnas Unedig – Ymchwil Anabledd ar Fyw’n Annibynnol a Dysgu (DRILL).

Cyllidwyd DRILL yn llawn gan Gronfa’r Loteri Fawr er mwyn ei weithredu ar draws y Deyrnas Unedig gan gonsortiwm o gyrff pobl anabl, yn cynnwys Anabledd Cymru.

Yn dilyn y lansiad ar 22 Medi, bydd DRILL Cymru yn cymell pobl anabl i gydweithio ochr yn ochr ag academyddion a llunwyr polisïau i ddatblygu’r rhaglen. Bydd yn crynhoi tystiolaeth am y ffactorau cymdeithasol sy’n rhwystro pobl anabl rhag byw’n annibynnol a dysgu. Yna, bydd yn defnyddio’r canlyniadau i ddatblygu projectau peilot a hysbysu datblygiad polisïau er cyflwyno gwelliannau gwirioneddol i fywydau pobl anabl.

Dywedodd Rhian Davies, prif weithredwraig Anabledd Cymru:

“Hon fydd y rhaglen ymchwil gyntaf i sicrhau bydd pobl anabl, a’r materion sy’n bwysig i ni, yn ganolog i benderfyniadau ar gyllido ymchwil. Y nod yw datblygu tystiolaeth gadarn ar fentrau a chymorth er galluogi pob anabl i chwarae rhan lawn mewn cymdeithas. Mae’n gwneud synnwyr i alluogi pawb i gyfrannu at gymdeithas. Gyda’r pwyslais yng Nghymru ar ‘lleisio barn a rheolaeth’, mae rhaglen DRILL yn amserol iawn ac yn gyfle gwych i gasglu tystiolaeth er siapio polisïau a deddfwriaeth o safbwynt dinasyddion.”

Rhagwelir bydd DRILL yn cyllido 40 project peilot ac ymchwil ar draws y Deyrnas Unedig. Bydd yn ymchwilio sut orau i ddefnyddio arian cyhoeddus i gefnogi cynhwysiad cymdeithasol, economaidd a gwleidyddol pobl anabl. A’r bwriad yw nodi atebion ar gyfer pobl gydag amrediad o amhariadau, a chyflyrau ac amgylchiadau iechyd cronig.

Pennir y meini prawf cyllid ar ôl cynnal cyfres o ddigwyddiadau gyda phobl anabl, o dan themâu ymchwil megis cymorth cyfoedion, annibyniaeth, dycnwch a chyfranogiad cymdeithasol, economaidd a dinesig. Bydd yn helpu pobl anabl i weithio ar gynigion ymchwil mewn partneriaeth ag academyddion a llunwyr polisïau.

Bydd Pwyllgor Ymchwil Canolog yn pennu pa gynigion ymchwil fydd yn derbyn cyllid. Dywedodd yr academydd anabl Dr Tom Shakespeare, cadeirydd y Pwyllgor:

“Mae ymchwil yn gallu gwneud gwahaniaeth gwirioneddol i fywydau pobl anabl, wrth nodi ein profiadau a’r rhwystrau byddwn yn wynebu. Ond yr ymchwil gorau yw gwaith gyda phobl anabl eu hunain. Rwy’n edrych ymlaen at weld y canlyniadau ymchwil.”

Bydd y rhaglen yn gwahodd cynigion ymchwil yn gynnar yn y Flwyddyn Newydd, gyda’r nod o gyhoeddi’r cymal cyllid cyntaf yn Ebrill 2016.

Manylion pellach yn www.drilluk.org.uk

Inclusion Scotland hosts Scottish launch of the world’s first disabled people led research programme today in Glasgow

This evening sees the Scottish launch of the world’s first disabled people led research programme at The Lighthouse in Glasgow.

Disability Research on Independent Living and Learning (DRILL) is an innovative research programme led in Scotland by Inclusion Scotland and partnered across the UK by Disability Action Northern Ireland, Disability Wales and Disability Rights UK. This ground breaking UK-wide programme is fully funded by a £5 million grant from the Big Lottery Fund. DRILL is expecting to fund a total of 40 research proposals and pilot projects over a 5 year period.

In what we believe to be a world first, disabled people will take the lead throughout. They will be at the forefront of designing projects. Funding streams will be based on disabled people’s priorities. Funding decisions will be made by a Central Research Committee, with a majority of disabled people.

The programme will be delivered in partnership with academics and policy makers to build a better evidence base about approaches that enable disabled people to achieve independent living – to have choice and control over their lives in ways non-disabled people take for granted. This will be used to inform future policy and service provision, and give a greater voice to disabled people on the issues that impact on them.

CEO of Inclusion Scotland, Dr Sally Witcher OBE said:

“Cuts to benefits and care packages have had a devastating impact on many disabled people, leaving them in poverty and with support merely to survive, but not to live. While clearly beyond the power of the DRILL programme to reverse these, it offers fantastic new opportunities to find innovative ways of removing the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating in all aspects of society as equal citizens.”

Paul Gray, Scottish Government Independent Living Champion and Director-General Health and Social Care and Chief Executive NHS Scotland said of the DRILL launch:

“The launch of DRILL is very timely, following the publication of the Scottish Government’s Draft Delivery Plan on implementing disabled people’s rights under the UN Convention. I am delighted to be involved in the launch event, and to support this important contribution to independent living in Scotland”.

Professor Nick Watson, Chair of Disability Studies at the University of Glasgow and Director of ‘What Works’ said:

“Giving control to disabled people and their organisations will ensure that the research commissioned by the programme addresses disabled people’s priorities and needs and that it will provide evidence that will shape future policy and practice development, bringing about real improvement in the lives of disabled people in Scotland and the rest of the UK.”

Dr Jim Elder-Woodward OBE, Independent Convenor of SILC and member of the DRILL National Advisory Group said:

“The Big Lottery Fund is to be congratulated for their foresight and trust in disabled people; for research done by disabled people on the world which disables them is much more powerful and revealing than research done on disabled people by those from that disabling world. The Lottery money will be used by disabled people not just to investigate the issues pertinent to their lives and their social, economic and civic emancipation, but to find the solutions we need.

Jackie Killeen, Director for Scotland, Big Lottery Fund said:

“I’m excited about this project as it clearly has scope to create a step change for disabled people and their ability to live independently. What’s key for me is that it is asking those with lived experience of disability to directly feed into the research. Partnership and co-production really strengthen this work and we hope the project’s results will go on to provide an evidence base to inform future policy and service provision across the UK.”

DRILL Launch Northern Ireland: Disabled people take the lead on £5 million research project

Disabled people will be at the forefront of designing projects for a new £5 million UK wide research programme to explore how disabled people can live more independent lives. The DRILL programme, which is launched in Northern Ireland on 16 September, will see disabled people working with academics and policy makers to develop research and pilot projects that will show how they, and people with long term health conditions, can be better supported to be full citizens.

The DRILL (Disability Research on Independent Living and Learning) programme is fully funded by Big Lottery Fund and will be led by, Disability Action in partnership with Inclusion Scotland, Disability Wales and Disability Rights UK,

Kevin Doherty, Chief Executive, Disability Action, said: “ultimately this is about making a real shift. Far too often disabled people are the subject of research but not participants in its development. We want academics and others to work in partnership with disabled people to build an evidence base that will contribute to making real change.”

DRILL is expecting to fund a total of 40 research proposals and pilot projects over a 5 year period. The programme which we believe to be a world first, aims to work in partnership with disabled people, academics and policy makers to build a better evidence base about approaches that enable people to live independently, which will be used to inform future policy and service provision, as well as giving greater voice to disabled people in the issues that impact them.

The criteria for funding will be decided after engagement events with people with disabilities around the UK, under the themes of peer support, autonomy, resilience and social, economic and civic participation. Disabled people and their organisations will be supported to work on their bids in partnership with academics and policy makers.

Speaking at the Launch, Philomena McCrory, Director of the Centre for Independent Living NI said:

“The Independent Living Movement is based on the firm belief that disabled people are the experts on how we achieve independent living and fulfil our individual potential. The DRILL Programme is therefore of great significance as we move our philosophy and ethos forward through the co-production of new research – disabled people taking the initiative individually and collectively in designing and promoting more effective solutions to the barriers we face in everyday life.”

Dr Bronagh Byrne of the School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast added:

“Building a truly inclusive society needs to be underpinned by a strong evidence base with disabled people at its core. I look forward to the DRILL Programme producing key research from across Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland and England in partnership with disabled people, academics, service providers and policy makers – research that is committed to and guided by the articles and principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.”

The first round of funding is expected to be launched in April 2016. For information on DRILL please visit www.drilluk.org.uk

DRILL Launch England: Disabled people take the lead on £5 million research project

Disabled people will be at the forefront of designing projects for a new £5 million research programme to explore how disabled people can live more independent lives.  The DRILL programme, which is launched in England on 15 September, will see disabled people working with academics and policy makers to develop research and pilot projects that will show how they, and people with long term health conditions, can be better supported to be full citizens.

The DRILL (Disability Research on Independent Living and Learning) programme is fully funded by Big Lottery Fund and will be delivered by Disability Rights UK, Disability Action Northern Ireland, Inclusion Scotland and Disability Wales.

Liz Sayce, chief executive of Disability Rights UK, said:

“This is the first research programme in the world which ensures disabled people, and the issues that matter to us, are central to research funding decisions. The aim is to build a better evidence base on the initiatives and support that enable disabled people to take full part in society. When everyone can participate in the world we live in, it makes sense for us all”.

DRILL is expecting to fund a total of 40 research proposals and pilot projects over a 5 year period. It will investigate how public money can be best used to enable disabled people to be full citizens – taking part socially, economically and politically; and what solutions will work best in a changing world (with changes in how we live, how we communicate, our economic position and how we use technologies) and for people living with a range of different impairments and circumstances.  

The criteria for funding will be decided after engagement events with disabled people around the UK, under the themes of peer support, autonomy, resilience and social, economic and civic participation. Disabled people and their organisations will be supported to work on their bids in partnership with academics and policy makers.

Speaking at the launch, Baroness Jane Campbell said:

“Without the independent living movement I would probably be living in an institution watching daytime TV; it seems a tad unlikely I would be in the House of Lords, shaping legislation. We need new solutions for a changing world, which is why it’s so great that the DRILL programme will be providing the evidence to create independent living opportunities in the future for more disabled people and, most importantly, will help ensure they do not slide backwards into dependency”.

Disability academic Dr Tom Shakespeare added:

“Research can make a real difference to disabled people’s lives.  It documents our experiences, and the barriers we face.  But the best research is done in partnership with disabled people themselves. I am looking forward to the new research findings with real excitement.”

The first round of funding is expected to be launched in April 2016. For more information on DRILL, please go to www.drilluk.org.uk

Big Lottery Fund: New Research Funding to Help Disabled Voices be Heard

The issues and challenges facing disabled people will soon be better understood thanks to new research made possible with a £5 million grant from the Big Lottery Fund.

Disability Action Northern Ireland and their partners Disability Rights UK, Disability Wales and Inclusion Scotland have been awarded the grant to carry out Disability Research on Independent Living and Learning (DRILL) project over the next five years. The research will focus on the extent to which disabled people are able to live independently whilst gathering their opinions on how changes could be made.

Prejudices and a predominantly medical view of disability can still lead to negative attitudes towards disabled people including those who are considering starting their own family or trying to get into education or employment. One of the consequences of negative attitudes towards employment and work is that disabled people earn less and are more likely to end up living in poverty.

With this in mind the new research will aim to build on existing knowledge and develop evidence from disabled people on the issues they face to help influence and inform policy and practice and provide greater opportunities for disabled people to live independently while challenging negative perceptions about disability. The research findings will include ideas from disabled people on how they believe change might be brought about.

Pilot projects will then be developed using the findings to shape future policy and bring about real improvements to the lives of disabled people across the UK.

Peter Ainsworth, Chairman of the Big Lottery Fund,said: “Prejudice and assumptions can blight every aspect of a disabled person’s life, from raising a family to finding meaningful employment. This funding will mean that those affected by disability can make their voices heard and put people directly affected by disability at the heart of how their needs are addressed.”

Kevin Doherty, Chief Executive of Disability Action Northern Ireland, said: “We’re delighted to secure this funding. It’s a massive opportunity for disabled people to tackle issues that affect them in their day-to-day living and I am proud that Disability Action Northern Ireland and our partners in the UK will deliver on the project.” 

 

Big Lottery Fund, Lottery Funded

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